Pembury Evening WI

Pembury Evening WI was formed in 1964 and we have a membership of about 35. We meet on the 1st Friday of the month at Pembury Village Hall. We have a wide range of speakers.

Below is part of our latest newsletter, the full one can be seen in the news section of our website and is a taster of what we did at our last meeting.

SEPTEMBER MEETING – Kay Hall, who is one of our members talked about the art of Macrame, before guiding us all in making a keyring using square knotting, the most common knot. Macramé is believed to have originated with 13th-century Arab weavers. These artisans knotted the excess thread and yarn along the edges of hand-loomed fabrics into decorative fringes on bath towels, shawls, and veils. After the Moorish conquest, the art was taken to Spain, then to Italy, and then spread through Europe. It was introduced into England at the court of Mary II in the late 17th century. Queen Mary taught the art of macramé to her ladies-in-waiting. Sailors made macramé objects in off hours while at sea, and sold or bartered them when they landed, thus spreading the art to places like China and the New World. Nineteenth-century British and American sailors made hammocks, bell fringes, and belts from macramé. They called the process “square knotting” after the knot they used most frequently. Macramé was most popular in the Victorian era. Most Victorian homes were adorned by this craft. Macramé was used to make household items such as tablecloths, bedspreads and curtains. Though the craze for macramé faded, it regained popularity during the 1970s as a means to make wall hangings, articles of clothing, bedspreads, small jean shorts, tablecloths, draperies, plant hangers and other furnishings. By the early 1980s macramé had again begun to fall out of fashion as a decoration trend.

However macramé has become popular again. This time in the form of jewellery, such as necklaces, anklets and bracelets.  Using mainly square knots this jewellery often features handmade glass beads and natural elements such as gemstones, bone or shell. Materials used in macramé include cords made of cotton twine, linen, hemp, jute, leather or yarn.  Jewellery is often made with a combination of knots and using various beads (glass, stone or wood), pendants or shells. http://www.ancientearthhealing.com/history-of-macrame/

 

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